The Null Device

2000/7/2

What were Apple thinking when they replaced the old, comfortable Macintosh mice with those horrible, hand-cramping round hockey-puck contraptions? Well, this story may have a happy ending, as they might kill it, replacing it with one that is actually usable without risk to health. The new mouse may also have no buttons, relying on a rocking motion to click.

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Virtual communities and such: A Swiss company is selling clothing with unique addresses that can be used to get in touch with the wearer.

Each article of clothing sold has a visible identifying number, which also doubles as a person's email address (a person wearing a sweatshirt with, for example, 012345 on the front can be contacted at 012345@skim.com), making it possible to contact (or "skim") someone who catches your interest.

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Interesting: One Gerard Jones reckons that violent media is good for kids, being essential for self-development. (MotherJones, via Barbelith)

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Here's something cool: the 17-kilometre Oresund Bridge has been opened between Copenhagen (in Denmark) and Malmo (in Sweden). The bridge is not only an impressive feat of engineering, but it makes the two cities, with different languages and histories, into a multinational, multilingual metropolis:

The Daimler-Chrysler corporation is the first to move its entire Scandinavian operation to the vicinity of the new bridge. A new cross-border newspaper has been started with identical editions in Danish and Swedish helping to foster the Oresund region`s own identity.

(via Virulent Memes)

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Scare meme of the day: As the Internet dot-com hype bubble bursts, large numbers of online retailers, founded on venture-capital funding and irrational exuberance, are going out of business. Many of them have, in their time, collected a lot of personal information about customers, notionally under strict privacy agreements. Now that the companies are headed for the e-afterlife, it seems that these agreements and their reputations for keeping to them don't matter any more, as many companies sell their private information, including credit-card numbers and buying patterns.

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