The Null Device

MySpace = Spam 2.0

What News Corp. doesn't want you to know about MySpace. It turns out that the grass-roots indie-hipster youth web sensation is actually nothing of the sort, but actually the product of a shady spam/adware company:
The whole site is, in essence, a marketing tool that everyone who registers has access to. Users constantly receive spam-like messages from said bands, business, and individuals looking to add more "friends" (and therefore more potential fans, consumers, or witnesses) to their online identity. A testament to this strange new social paradigm is the phrase "Thanks for the Add," a nicety offered when one MySpace user adds another as a friend. Best yet, to use the site, members must log in, causing them to inadvertently view advertisements, and then read their messages on a page with even more advertisements. In the world of MySpace, Spam is earth, air, fire, and water.
3. Tom Anderson did NOT create MySpace. Most users don't know that Tom Anderson (pictured) is more of a PR scheme than anything else--the mascot designed to give a friendlier feel to a site created by a marketing company known for viral entertainment websites, pop-up advertising, spam, spyware, and adware. As MySpace's popularity grew, the MySpace team moved to create a false PR story that would best reflect the ideals and tastes of its growing demographic. They wanted to prevent the revelation that a Spam 1.0 company had launched the site, and created the impression that Tom Anderson created the site, and the lie worked. According to Anderson, the bulk of his initial contribution is as follows: "I am as anti-social as they come, and I've already got 20 people to sign up."
Which goes some way towards explaining the numerous irritating, spammy, user-hostile design decisions all over MySpace. If this article is true, then being acquired by Murdoch may have even made MySpace less evil.

There are 1 comments on "MySpace = Spam 2.0":

Posted by: Newob www.myspace.com/tedbowen Mon Dec 11 06:26:42 2006

Oy acb,

Yeah, the ads are annoying, but then if you are accustomed to television, they are nothing in comparison. It may be a hokey, and software-challenged site, but I've actually found some old friends there. It may not be an ideal site, but it is free to use and does somewhat simplify the creation of a web page, for the programming-challenged among us. I don't intend to use Myspace exclusively, but it is useful for connecting to people (if only because it happens to be so popular at the moment), and will make it easier for me to transition to my own web site.

My two cents,

Newob

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